Cervical Lymph Node Stations – a landmark approach

In this quick video, Dr. Bailey walks us through a quick overview of 6 of the common cervical nodal stations in the neck. Each lymph node in the neck is assigned one of these 6 levels based on their relationship with normal anatomic structures in the neck. These stations are important in communicating with other physicians which abnormal nodes we are talking about.

By using only these 8 landmarks, you can feel confident that you are properly identifying the right nodal locations:

1. Anterior belly digastric
2. Submandibular gland
3. Hyoid bone
4. Cricoid cartilage
5. Sternocleidomastoid muscle
6. Clavicles
7. Carotids
8. Sternum

Hopefully this helps you be more clear in your reports and better understand the different lymph node levels in the neck.

Thanks for tuning in and be sure to check out the head and neck topic page as well as all the head and neck videos on the site.

 

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Temporal bone CT – Pathology based approach

In this second video about the temporal bone, Dr. Katie Bailey from the University of South Florida goes over some common pathology of the temporal bone. If you haven’t seen the first video and want to learn more about a general approach to reviewing temporal bone CT, go back and check out the first video.

The overview puts this video in the context of the outside-in approach reviewed in the first video. You can think about which diseases are most prevalent in each compartment based on location. A general differential of infection, inflammation, and tumor is a good place to start.

Otitis externa – a common pathology characterized by thickening of the mucosa of the external auditory canal. It may be accompanied by fluid in the mastoids and middle ear.

Malignant otitis externa – a variant of otitis externa in which you have destruction of the adjacent bone. You can also have soft tissue or intracranial abscesses as a complication.

External auditory canal neoplasm – soft tissue in the external auditory canal with adjacent bone destruction. The imaging appearance overlaps with malignant otitis.

Otitis media – characterized by fluid within the middle ear and around the ossicles. Most commonly in the mesotympanum and hypotympanum. There is often associated fluid in the mastoid air cells (otomastoiditis).

Cholesteatoma – a soft tissue mass often originating in Prussak’s space which results in blunting of the scutum and bone erosion.

Ossicular disruption – the ossicular chain can be disrupted, most often in trauma. The most common disruption is the malleoincudal joint, or loss of the “ice cream cone”.

Aberrant ICA – as a variant, the internal carotid artery can be located too medially, where it will lack a complete bony covering in the foramen lacerum. This can lead to complications of mastoid surgery and is important not to miss.

Dehiscent jugular bulb – the jugular vein should also have a bony covering between it and the middle ear.

Tympanicum paraganglioma (glomus tympanicum) – a vascular tumor of the middle ear starting at the cochlear promontory.

Labyrinthitis ossificans – sclerosis of the cochlea or semicircular canals. The cochlea or semicircular canals may be narrowed or sclerotic, usually from prior infection.

Semicircular canal dehiscence – loss of bone adjacent to the semicircular canal. This most commonly occurs along the superior aspect of the superior semicircular canal.

Otosclerosis – abnormal bone most commonly in the fissula ante fenestrum, manifested by lucent bone where it should be dense cortical bone.

Facial nerve – the facial nerve should have a smooth bony covering around it. If you see loss of bone, you should think about a hemangioma or a facial nerve schwannoma, two tumors that frequently occur in this area.

Thanks for tuning in and be sure to come back to check out part 1, temporal bone CT search pattern. Or you can see all of the temporal bone videos or all the search pattern videos.

 

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Temporal bone CT search pattern

Today we have a special guest, Dr. Katie Bailey from the University of South Florida who is presenting her approach to the temporal bone. Special thanks to her for this great video, and hopefully we will be having a lot of great new content from her in the future. This video will be part 1 of 2 in overviewing a starting approach to reviewing the temporal bone.

In this video, she goes through her structure approach to CT of the temporal bone. This approach is based upon an outside-in strategy, where you first look at the external ear, the middle ear, and then the inner ear. The coronal view is a nice place to start.

The key feature of the external ear is the external auditory canal, which should be patent but have a thin lining of mucosa. The external auditory canal ends at the scutum a thin sliver of bone along the top of the EAC.

The middle ear begins at the tympanic membrane, which should be so thin you can barely see it. The tympanic membrane articulates with the long arm of the malleus. A key space above the scutum is called Prussak’s space, which is a common location for cholesteatomas. The middle ear should only contain soft tissue and air. The middle ear is divided into upper (epitympanum), middle (mesotympanum), and lower (hypotempanum) segments. You should also be able to see the footplate of the stapes articulating with the oval window.

The mastoids connect with the middle ear and should be filled with air (no fluid or soft tissue). The roof of the mastoids is the tegmen mastoideum.

The inner ear contains the cochlea and semicircular canals. The cochlea should have 2 ½ turns and be surrounded by bright cortical bone. You have 3 semicircular canals (superior, lateral, and inferior) and should be about the same width. The internal auditory canal is hard to evaluate by CT but should be roughly a similar diameter with no expansion or loss of bone.

The facial nerve canal can be confusing. It is easiest to find at the stylomastoid foramen. You can follow it superiorly before turning and going under the lateral semicircular canal. The bone should be intact until it reaches the geniculate ganglion.

You can then turn to the axial views and review the ossicles. The malleus and incus should look like an ice cream cone. Another key feature is the fissula ante fenestrum, or the cortical bone next to the cochlea. This is a common place where otosclerosis can begin.

Finally, you want to review the axial images for everything out of the temporal bone. This includes the brain, sinuses, orbits, nasal cavity, salivary glands, and visible portions of the pharynx.

Summary. A coronal, outside-in approach to the temporal bone is a nice way to systematically review the temporal bone.

Thanks for tuning in and be sure to come back to check out part 2, temporal bone pathology. Or you can see all of the temporal bone videos or all the search pattern videos.

 

See this and other videos on our Youtube channel

Temporal bone

This is a collection of videos about the temporal bone. The temporal bone can be intimidating, especially to those just beginning their review of temporal bone imaging, particularly computed tomography (CT). These videos show you a systematic approach to the temporal bone which can help you master the basics and give you a foundation as you move on to learning more specifics about the pathology.

Board Review 3 – Case 19

Neuroradiology board review. This lecture is geared towards the ABR core exam for residents, but it would be useful for review for the ABR certifying exam or certificate of added qualification (CAQ) exam for neuroradiology.

More description and the answer (spoiler!) are seen below the video.

This case shows a CT of the neck with a centrally necrotic mass in the left deep soft tissues, most likely associated with necrotic lymphadenopathy. CT images of the upper chest show tree-in-bud nodules within the upper lungs which are suspicious for infection.

The diagnosis is: mycobacterial lymphadenitis

Mycobacterial infection in the neck is most often manifested by multiple abnormal lymph nodes, often with a necrotic core. The degree of adjacent soft tissue swelling and edema is less than is typically seen with a purulent adenitis such as staphylococcus. Mycobacterium tuberculosis is the most common although there are a number of others which can cause infection, such as m. avium and m. kansasii (as in this case). The lung images are a nice clue here that the patient has a systemic infection.

Biopsy may be required to exclude malignancy, as a top differential is squamous cell carcinoma of the neck. Treatment is anti-mycobacterial drugs.

Arterial dissection is associated with a variety of conditions, including trauma, fibromuscular dysplasia, vasculitis, and connective tissue disorders.

Board Review 3 – Case 18

Neuroradiology board review. This lecture is geared towards the ABR core exam for residents, but it would be useful for review for the ABR certifying exam or certificate of added qualification (CAQ) exam for neuroradiology.

More description and the answer (spoiler!) are seen below the video.

This case shows a patient with Horner’s syndrome who has subtle narrowing of the extracranial internal carotid artery on the left. On T1 fat-saturated imaging, there is a crescent of methemoglobin within the medial aspect of the vessel wall.

The diagnosis is: internal carotid artery dissection

Anytime a patient, particularly a young patient, has acute onset of neurologic symptoms, arterial dissection has to be on the differential. When it is accompanied by a Horner’s syndrome, internal carotid dissection is high on the differential because the sympathetic fibers for they eye travel alongside the carotid artery.

Arterial dissection is injury to the walls of the vessel. Most often the innermost layer, the intima, is separated from the deeper layers, the media and adventitia. It can be associated with a visible flap of lifted intima in the vessel and a portion of the vessel which is not carrying blood, a false lumen. When the vessel is disrupted enough to have visible dilation, this is a pseudoaneurysm.

In this case, the MR angiogram findings are quite subtle, but the key is the T1 fat-saturated images, which show a crescent of methemoglobin in the vessel wall. Fat saturation is required to differentiate this hyperintensity from the adjacent fat in the neck, which is also hyperintense.

Arterial dissection is associated with a variety of conditions, including trauma, fibromuscular dysplasia, vasculitis, and connective tissue disorders.

Board Review 3 – Case 17

Neuroradiology board review. This lecture is geared towards the ABR core exam for residents, but it would be useful for review for the ABR certifying exam or certificate of added qualification (CAQ) exam for neuroradiology.

More description and the answer (spoiler!) are seen below the video.

This case shows a CT with a soft tissue density mass extending from the frontal sinus through the outer table to the prefrontal scalp soft tissues.

The diagnosis is: frontal sinus osteomyelitis/Pott’s puffy tumor

Sometimes acute sinusitis can be complicated by adjacent osteomyelitis and bone destruction, such as in this case. The most likely location for this to happen is in the frontal sinus, when the diagnosis has the moniker “Pott’s puffy tumor”.

It is important when this happens to do an MRI of the brain to check for intracranial complications, such as meningitis, dural sinus invasion, and epidural abscess. The differential diagnosis includes malignancy (metastatic disease, lymphoma, and primary sinus malignancy), mucocele, and inflammatory diseases such as granolumatosis with polyangiitis.

Board Review 3 – Case 15

Neuroradiology board review. This lecture is geared towards the ABR core exam for residents, but it would be useful for review for the ABR certifying exam or certificate of added qualification (CAQ) exam for neuroradiology.

More description and the answer (spoiler!) are seen below the video.

This case shows an avidly enhancing mass in the left neck which has the appearance of a tangle of vessels. These images are from a CT angiogram and the enhancement is very similar to the vascular structures, so you are likely looking at a vascular abnormality.

The diagnosis is: soft tissue arteriovenous malformation (AVM)

In this case, the abnormality has a lot of arterial enhancing components and there are associated abnormal veins, so there is a shunt between the arterial and venous structures, making this an AVM.

When looking at soft tissue vascular malformations, there is a relatively simple algorithm you can go through. If a mass has a soft tissue component, then it is a hemangioma because it has a proliferative mass component. If it has high flow components (like in this case), it is an arteriovenous malformation or AVM. If it has multiple cystic regions with fluid levels, it is a lymphatic malformation. The remaining abnormalities with slow flow vessels are venous malformations. There is a lot of overlap, with many vascular malformations having multiple components.

The treatment of these lesions is most commonly surgery, often with embolization before to reduce the amount of bleeding during resection. Sclerotherapy (or injection of a sclerotic agent through the skin) is usually not an option because these are high flow lesions and the agent will disperse to other areas in the body.

Board Review 3 – Case 9

Neuroradiology board review. This lecture is geared towards the ABR core exam for residents, but it would be useful for review for the ABR certifying exam or certificate of added qualification (CAQ) exam for neuroradiology.

More description and the answer (spoiler!) are seen below the video.

This case shows a mass in the left cerebellopontine angle (CP angle). It is predominantly outside of the internal auditory canal (IAC), although there is extension into the canal. It is relatively homogeneous with avid post-contrast enhancement.

The diagnosis is: meningioma

Meningiomas are the most common brain tumors (although they are extra-axial). They often have a cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) cleft around them which allow you to determine that they are extra-axial. They can calcify and cause adjacent hyperostosis of the bone.

A useful approach to CP angle masses is to first consider whether it is cystic or solid. Solid masses enhance on post-contrast imaging. If they are centered in the IAC and cause expansion, it is most likely a schwannoma. If it does not cause expansion or looks centered outside the IAC, think about meningioma.

Board Review Cases – Head and Neck

This playlist is a collection of only the head and neck imaging board review cases on this site. This includes pathologies such as head and neck cancer and skull base abnormalities.

These cases are geared towards preparation for the radiology resident ABR core exam, although similar material is used for the ABR certifying exam general and neuroradiology sections as well as neuroradiology CAQ. The format of this playlist is case-based. Each case consists of a series of images followed by 1 or 2 questions. The first question is usually to name the diagnosis, while the second is a multiple choice question to test deeper understanding of the specific condition. Try to get the diagnosis before you see the second questions.