Books

While the number of online resources for learning radiology have expanded over the years, books are still a key part of the educational process. To a certain extent, there is nothing better than having a paper copy of a book to glance through, especially after a day of eye fatigue from staring at a screen. This is a starter list of some books that might be useful to the neuroradiology trainee. There are a number of other online resources that can be valuable to learners interested in neuroradiology ranging from medical students to advanced trainees and faculty. While not comprehensive, this is a short list of some of the resources available and worth checking out.

 

Detailed Book Recommendations

 

If you just want to see a the books in a list without comments, I compiled an easy to use list on Amazon where you can easily purchase the books if you like (*disclaimer: the book list is an Amazon affiliate links. I get a small referral fee which helps fund this site if you purchase through these links.)


Neuroradiology book list at Amazon

There are a bunch of books you might study as part of learning neuroradiology. This isn’t intended to be an exhaustive list, but may be a couple of books which I am familiar with and which are relevant to this site. More specific links for individual books may be found on other pages with individual recommendations.

 

There are a couple of key journals which are great for neuroradiology education, such as AJNR, Radiographics, and Neurographics. I recommend that you check these journals out routinely and look to them for reference articles. There is a range of content available, ranging all the way from medical students to fellows and faculty. In general, as one progresses in training they should become decreasingly reliant on books and more invested in the primary literature.

 

Neuroradiology Journals 

 

Online Resources

There are a number of other online resources that can be valuable to learners interested in neuroradiology ranging from medical students to advanced trainees and faculty. While not comprehensive, this is a short list of some of the resources available and worth checking out.

NeuroradiologyU

Learningneuroradiology

Headneckbrainspine

Radiopaedia

 

Detailed Website Recommendations

Social media has become a regular site of new medical education content in radiology, especially on Twitter . There are two major uses of Twitter in academic medicine right now, professional interactions and open medical education. Learn some great people to follow and get out on social media today.

 

Social Media